Dynamic reconstruction and rendering of 3d tomosynthesis images

In this example, the x-ray focus is moved continuously while a small number of discrete linear detectors produce a sequential set of linear images of the anatomy. Note that only a small number of acquisition locations are shown for clarity.

Dynamic reconstruction and rendering of 3d tomosynthesis images

The method includes the steps of loading a set of projection images into a memory device, determining a reconstruction method for the set of projection images, reconstructing a 3D tomographic image from the set of projection images to be displayed to a user; and performing any post reconstruction processing on the 3D tomographic image.

Tomography is imaging by sections or sectioning an object into multiple images, and reconstructing the images to view an object of interest. The advantage of tomography over conventional x-ray imaging is that it eliminates the superimposition of images of structures and tissues outside the area of interest.

Today, projection mammography is considered the gold standard for the detection of breast cancer. However, both film-screen and digital mammography are subject to a number of fundamental limitations related to the projection process, whereby two-dimensional 2D images are produced of the 3D breast anatomy.

As a result, mammography superimposes normal tissues resulting in artifactual densities that often necessitate a biopsy; this leads to a loss in specificity.

In addition, true lesions may be masked by the superimposed normal tissue and thereby rendered undetectable; this reduces the sensitivity of mammography.

Tomographic x-ray breast imaging would obviate these limitations. It is widely believed that digital breast tomosynthesis DBT has the potential to replace mammography both digital and film in the future, based on preliminary clinical results.

Dynamic reconstruction and rendering of 3d tomosynthesis images

In Digital Tomosynthesis, a 3D tomographic image of an object is reconstructed from a limited set of 2D radiographic projection images. A digital tomosynthesis system includes one or more x-ray sources and one or more one-dimensional 1D or 2D x-ray digital detectors.

In the most common form of digital tomosynthesis, an x-ray source is rotated by a gantry in an arc through a limited range of angles about a pivot point.

A set of projection radiographs of the object are acquired by the detector at discrete locations about the x-ray source. In other embodiments, the source may be held stationary while the detectors are moved, or the source and the detector may both move.

In this acquisition system, the x-ray focus Fi is positioned sequentially at multiple locations F1, F2, F3. At each location Fia projection image of the acquired anatomy in this case, the breast is made onto the detector to produce an image Di.

A lesion shown as a dot in plane R will be projected to different locations on the detector. When backprojected, the various images will add coherently in the tomosynthesis image of plane R to reconstruct the lesion.

For illustration, the x-ray foci Fi are shown in an arc with equal spacing; in fact, the location and spacing of the x-ray foci may be arbitrary.

Dynamic Reconstruction and Rendering of 3D Tomosynthesis Images | Request PDF

Similarly, the detector is shown to be held rigidly; again, this is only for the purposes of illustration; the detector may also be oriented in an arbitrary manner. In this example, detector D rotates as the x-ray focus Fi moves through a limited range of angles.

A lesion again shown as a dot in plane R will be projected to different locations on the detector. When backprojected, the various images will add coherently in the tomosynthesis image of the plane R to reconstruct the lesion. However, the angle of the x-ray detector to the central axis of the x-ray beam can be arbitrary.A method of dynamically reconstructing three dimensional (3D) tomographic images from a set of projection images is disclosed.

The method includes the steps of loading a set of projection images into a memory device, determining a reconstruction method for the set of projection images, reconstructing a 3D tomographic image from the set of projection images to be displayed to a user; and.

Abstract Dynamic Reconstruction and Rendering (DRR) is a fast and flexible tomosynthesis image reconstruction and display implementation. By leveraging the computational efficiency gains afforded by off-the-shelf GPU hardware, tomosynthesis reconstruction can be performed on demand at real-time, user-interactive frame rates.

A method of dynamically reconstructing three dimensional (3D) tomographic images from a set of projection images is disclosed. The method includes the steps of loading a set of projection images into a memory device, determining a reconstruction method for the set of projection images, reconstructing a 3D tomographic image from the set of projection images .

Dynamic tomographic image reconstruction and rendering on-demand - Real-Time Tomography, LLC The method includes the steps of loading a set of projection images into a memory device, determining a reconstruction method for the set of projection images, reconstructing a 3D tomographic image from the set of projection images to be displayed to a user; and performing any post reconstruction processing on the 3D tomographic image. Tomography is imaging by sections or sectioning an object into multiple images, and reconstructing the images to view an object of interest.
Dynamic tomographic image reconstruction and rendering on-demand - Real-Time Tomography, LLC Muhammad Abir This project seeks to assess the geometric stability of the U-Mo monolithic fuel system by evaluating the radiation-induced changes in the AFIP-7 experiment device. Neutron radiography and computed tomography CT provide valuable information about the post-irradiation condition of the fuel specimen.
Tomography is imaging by sections or sectioning an object into multiple images, and reconstructing the images to view an object of interest. The advantage of tomography over conventional x-ray imaging is that it eliminates the superimposition of images of structures and tissues outside the area of interest.
Tomography is imaging by sections or sectioning an object into multiple images, and reconstructing the images to view an object of interest.

Dynamic reconstruction and rendering of 3D tomosynthesis images By leveraging the computational efficiency gains afforded by off-the-shelf GPU hardware, tomosynthesis reconstruction can be performed on demand at real-time, user-interactive frame rates.

Jul 31,  · A method of dynamically reconstructing three dimensional (3D) tomographic images from a set of projection images is disclosed. The method includes the steps of loading a set of projection images into a memory device, determining a reconstruction method for the set of projection images, reconstructing a 3D tomographic image from the set of projection images .

Dynamic Reconstruction and Rendering of 3D Tomosynthesis Images Dynamic Reconstruction and Rendering (DRR) is a fast and flexible tomosynthesis image reconstruction and display implementation.

By leveraging the computational efficiency gains afforded by off-the-shelf GPU hardware.